Recurrent tendonitis: 6 tips to get rid of it

If, like many, you have already suffered from repeated tendinitis or joint problems , you know the absolute mess in which these pains can plunge you. They ruin all the hard-earned results!

Whether it's to lose fat, build muscle, or just keep in shape, it's extremely difficult to continue exercising under these conditions. Moreover, everything becomes very complicated when the slightest repetition forces you to grit your teeth...

Indeed, as long as your injury is well carabined, it even restricts you in the gestures of daily life. Gestures as banal as putting on your coat or climbing your stairs can quickly become unbearable!

It's a shame, knowing that we swore to you that sport is good for health 😅

If you begin to doubt it, rest assured.

Your body does need to move to stay young and infallible (slender and attractive too, but that's not exactly what you were looking for, is it?)

The problem? It is that there are mandatory rules to respect. And among all the advice that you will unearth in the internet jungle, it is sometimes impossible to find your way around!

The origin of recurrent tendonitis

I'm not saying all of this advice should be thrown away. But they rarely take into account the secret, the No. 1 key, to prevent you from attracting the evil eye to your joints.

Inspired by the work of Dr Jill Cook, an essential specialist in this field, I have prepared a list of 6 tips to help you ward off fate in the event of recurrent tendonitis.

Because I know how disheartening it can be to see all your hard work unfairly wiped out by a simple muscle attachment injury.

SmartWorkout Elite

Other articles on pain and tendinitis

Before you read on, here are some other topics on this theme:

You will find the complete list of articles on the site at this page.

Let me help you fix it

First of all, let's start at the beginning: what is tendonitis?

To put it simply, it is an attack on the structure that attaches the muscle to the bone: the tendon. In medical jargon, the term has been replaced by "tendinopathy". (It's crazy what we cultivate here!)

“Very well, but where does it come from and how do I avoid it? you will tell me. In reality and despite everything that one may read or hear, the answer is very simple. Tendinitis occurs when one has exceeded one's ability to withstand mechanical stress. Clearly, when we have done too much, especially with repetitive movements!

The whole secret to escaping it therefore lies in measuring your activity…

What, all for that?

Well no, not quite. I would not allow myself to keep you in suspense for so little! (Although I take great pleasure in it…)

As you read on, you'll realize that learning to gauge your activity is quite a (ninja) art. And that even professional athletes regularly get lost.

The error that was worth 3 billion

mistake to avoid for recurrent tendonitis

The most common fundamental error that I have observed is to think that you can rely on your feeling of fatigue to know if you are doing too much or not. You know, that moment when you feel like nothing can stop you. 

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"Come on, I have some juice left, I'm going to lift heavier!" » or « This time I run 20 more minutes, easy! I'm not even in the red. 

In general, this is where the disaster occurs...

Unfortunately, most people forget or ignore that when we train, our muscles, our heart and our lungs are not the only ones to improve. 

Different structures like our bones or tendons are stressed and thus react slowly to become more resistant.

Eventually, feelings of shortness of breath or muscle burning only tell us that we are running out of fuel. They do not tell us if our timing belt is about to fail (and break the rest of the engine in the process).

To find your way around and escape tendonitis, you need to find a much better solution. And the good news is that the latter is well known to physiotherapists. It can be summed up in 3 words: Quantification of Mechanical Stress.

Eh ? The quanti-what? Do not panic ! Basically, it comes down to measuring the volume and intensity of your workouts and gradually increasing them. The strength of this model lies in the fact that it takes into account your state of fatigue, your physical sensations...and all the factors that can influence your recovery.

Yes, because you are more likely to injure yourself if you spend your nights ruminating during particularly stressful periods of your life.

To help you properly “quantify” your mechanical stress and make tendonitis a distant memory, here are 6 essential tips:

PhenQ

Tip 1: The rule of 10 %

I think I've harped on your ears enough with that, but it's the most important thing to avoid repeated tendonitis: Be progressive and never give in to impatience, especially the first days of training. Whatever they are, your goals will always be achieved over time.

your body to need some time to solidify.

And this is especially true for your tendons (and your bones), which are slower to react structures than your muscles. Good tendinitis can take 3 months or more to be cured. Believe me, it's better to learn to slow down...

So the rule of thumb is to incorporate any changes into your training very slowly! A good benchmark is the rule of 10 %. In most of the cases, do not increase your training volume by more than 10 TP2T per week (number of repetitions or km of running).

However, this percentage is not absolute and must take into account your level, your fatigue and your years of training. Increasing the weights or resistance you use for an exercise should be even more gradual.

The most common fundamental error that I have observed is to think that you can rely on your feeling of fatigue to know if you are doing too much or not. You know, that moment when you feel like nothing can stop you. 

"Come on, I have some juice left, I'm going to lift heavier!" » or « This time I run 20 more minutes, easy! I'm not even in the red. 

In general, this is where the disaster occurs...

Unfortunately, most people forget or ignore that when we train, our muscles, our heart and our lungs are not the only ones to improve. 

Different structures like our bones or tendons are stressed and thus react slowly to become more resistant.

Eventually, feelings of shortness of breath or muscle burning only tell us that we are running out of fuel. They do not tell us if our timing belt is about to fail (and break the rest of the engine in the process).

To find your way around and escape tendonitis, you need to find a much better solution. And the good news is that the latter is well known to physiotherapists. It can be summed up in 3 words: Quantification of Mechanical Stress.

Eh ? The quanti-what? Do not panic ! Basically, it comes down to measuring the volume and intensity of your workouts and gradually increasing them. The strength of this model lies in the fact that it takes into account your state of fatigue, your physical sensations...and all the factors that can influence your recovery.

ALSO READ:  Sports goals: 12 tips to achieve them in 2022

Yes, because you are more likely to injure yourself if you spend your nights ruminating during particularly stressful periods of your life.

To help you properly “quantify” your mechanical stress and make tendonitis a distant memory, here are 6 essential tips:

Tip 1: The rule of 10 %

I think I've harped on your ears enough with that, but it's the most important thing to avoid repeated tendonitis: Be progressive and never give in to impatience, especially the first days of training. Whatever they are, your goals will always be achieved over time.

your body to need some time to solidify.

And this is especially true for your tendons (and your bones), which are slower to react structures than your muscles. Good tendinitis can take 3 months or more to be cured. Believe me, it's better to learn to slow down...

So the rule of thumb is to incorporate any changes into your training very slowly! A good benchmark is the rule of 10 %. In most of the cases, do not increase your training volume by more than 10 TP2T per week (number of repetitions or km of running).

However, this percentage is not absolute and must take into account your level, your fatigue and your years of training. Increasing the weights or resistance you use for an exercise should be even more gradual.

Tip 2: Learn to recognize the signs

Recurrent tendonitis: 6 tips to get rid of it 1

Whether it's by choice or lack of attention, ignoring the signals your body sends you can be tragic. In general, you must always respect the rule of non-pain during your workouts. 

All the pains or feelings of tightness should alert you and prompt you to stop your exercises (especially when they are located on your tendons and bones).

Attention ! The tendons are sometimes slow to react to the effort, you may not feel any discomfort until the next day. If it is stiffness accentuated with the awakening, one or two short days of rest will be enough for you to recover. 

If, on the other hand, you are subject to painful sensations due, for example, to rubbing of the tendon, a greater rest period might be necessary.

Silhouette program

Tip 3: Recognize the different types of movement

The level of stress applied to a tendon also depends on the type of movement you perform. The greater the speed of your impacts, the more your tendons will be stressed.

This is because the latter act partly as springs during explosive exercises. For the more curious among you, in sports jargon, we speak of "plyometric" exercises.

Well that's the theory, but in practice, what does it give?

What should be remembered is that the static exercises (such as sheathing) will not be dangerous. Note that I didn't say easy! But in any case, very little risk in terms of tendonitis. Depending on your level you could even add a little weight without any problem.

On the other hand, explosive drills like jumping rope or burpees should make you careful, very careful! And this, even if you have good cardiovascular capacities. And this is even more true if you exercise with unsuitable shoes or equipment.

Remember, having a good breath in no way guarantees you a strong body. So if you don't want to end up with a tennis ball instead of the Achilles tendon, incorporate this kind of exercise very gradually.

Tip 4: Change your schedule

The Internet is full of sports programs of all kinds. You may have read there that you should never train the same part of your body more than 2 to 3 times a week?

Most of the time, this is very good advice (especially if your goal is performance or muscle mass gain). But did you know that your tendons react better to small regular stimulations rather than rare and intense efforts?

ALSO READ:  8 back pain exercises to relieve you quickly

If you feel tension and stiffness occurring more and more often in a tendon, it may be time to change your training schedule. After one to three days of rest, begin to increase the frequency of your workouts. 

Yes, you read that right, increase not decrease. And no I'm not crazy! Let me explain to you.

I suggest you increase the frequency of your exercises per week but not the overall volume of repetitions. Thanks to this, you will allow your tendons to be better stimulated.

Need an example?

If you used to do 6 sets of 10 push-ups 3 times a week (180 reps between Monday and Sunday), you can do 3 sets of 12 push-ups 5 times a week (still 180 total). Of course, you will be wary at the same time of the risk linked to insufficient heating. Its consequences are as terrible as those of excessive training or bad technical gestures.

Understand, however, that during this phase, the objective is no longer to gain muscle at all costs but to improve the strength of your tendons.

Tip 5: Watch out for popular myths

When it comes to sports training or health, you will quickly notice that everyone has something to say. Most of the time, it starts with a good intention.

But you could quickly feel overwhelmed by this constant stream of (sometimes contradictory) information.

My advice ? " KpeepIyou Simple and Stupid, (KISS)” which you could translate as: the solution often remains simple and stupid.

The treatment failures of most tendinopathies in rehabilitation come either from a bad dosage of the training load, or from a bad diagnosis.

What you should conclude is that if you feel that your tendons are starting to tire, it's quite simply that you do too much. It's tempting to want to try the latest fad diet that's guaranteed to eliminate a trigger food or the latest miracle joint supplement.

Keep it simple by avoiding an unbalanced diet (reducing processed foods). Eat a varied diet with enough plants and stay well hydrated. That will be enough.

Tip 6: Beware of self-medication

I know that some people opt for taking certain over-the-counter medications to prevent post-workout pain and soreness.

Several types of medications, such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and corticosteroids, can be dangerous for your tendons. They inhibit the inflammatory process essential to the strengthening of the latter.

In the long term, their repeated catches therefore increase the fragility of your tissues! Always consult your doctor before considering consuming it. 

Finally, other medications, such as certain antibiotics, can also have a deleterious effect on your tendons. Again, ask your doctor for advice.

Avoiding Recurrent Tendinitis – Conclusion

You will have understood that tendinitis always rhymes with overwork. It is not always easy to realize this and even less to correct the situation when the accumulation of stress is felt!

Thanks to these 6 tips, you are now equipped to disentangle fact from fiction and avoid disaster. Put them into practice and you will gradually regain confidence in yourself and your abilities.

I am sure that then you will also resume the course of achieving your goals. Whatever they are, that's all I wish for you…and without a doubt, all that you have hard-deserved!

Leave a message in the comment box below to ask your questions or share your experience. THANK YOU !

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